Building a Preventive Crime Gun Strategy: A Playbook for Success

Building a Preventive Crime Gun Strategy: A Playbook for Success
Duration: 60 Minutes
Module 1 Resources
Recorded on: 2019-01-24
Unit 1 Slide Deck: Building a Preventive Crime Gun Strategy: A Playbook for Success
Unit 2 Workbook: Building a Preventive Crime Gun Strategy: A Playbook for Success
Unit 3 Recording: Building a Preventive Crime Gun Strategy: A Playbook for Success

Building a preventive crime gun program is no easy feat. For it to be successful, it requires the buy-in of everyone involved. It takes a holistic approach that mobilizes both the community and law enforcement. This course guides the participants through the components of a successful preventive crime gun strategy so that they can design a program tailor-fit for all the needs and goals that their jurisdiction may have.

To better understand the concepts and elements to be discussed, Justice Clearinghouse and ULTRA Electronics Forensic Technology employed the help of two law enforcement veterans who created an effective crime gun program for their respective jurisdictions. Major Michael Kane from the New Jersey State Police provides an overview of how a large agency was able to develop their crime gun program. Meanwhile, Sergeant Josh May describes how Chattanooga Police Department, a smaller, non-lab-based PD was able to maximize their crime gun strategy. Jim Needles, the North American Forensic Intelligence and Strategy Manager of ULTRA Electronics Forensic Technology facilitates the discussion.

Major Kane and Sergeant May share best practices, challenges faced, and lessons learned on this session. Specifics of the webinar include:

  • An overview of the book Building a Preventive Crime Gun Strategy: A Playbook for Success by Ron Nichols that is the basis of the webinar.
  • The first component of an effective program – Stakeholder Buy-In that requires you secure the support from the major players in your agency as well as related sectors.
    • New Jersey State Police’s approach that emphasized the importance of results and commitment from the agency, the partners, and the community to prevent gun violence.
    • Chattanooga PD’s strategy that focused on the methodology – from policies, procedures, and training that allowed the stakeholders and the community to see the impact of the program.
  • The second component – a regional approach to bridge jurisdictional gaps as shooters and firearms cross jurisdiction borders.
    • New Jersey’s program that established a common strategy and increased communication, coordination, and collaboration between the agencies and partners.
    • Chattanooga’s approach that pushed for the eradication of information silos and encouraged intelligence sharing through timely evidence entry and assigning a dedicated point person.
  • The third component and the cornerstone of an effective preventive crime gun strategy, the NIBIN program that generates actionable leads by linking firearms used in shootings.
    • New Jersey State Police’s strategy that reduced turnaround time in ballistic evidence processing by putting NIBIN processing at the front end of the procedure.
    • Chattanooga’s initiative that created their Gun Team, a unit dedicated solely for NIBIN processing and follow-ups.
  • The fourth component of ensuring that technologies employed can be integrated together to provide irrefutable data and the different overlaid technologies utilized by the New Jersey State Police and Chattanooga PD.
  • The critical component of knowing the offenders and how they interact.
    • How New Jersey did this through regular inter-agency meetings.
    • Chattanooga’s method that employed social network analysis, data-driven policing, coordination with probation and parole, and open lines of communication.
  • The sixth component that stresses the need for collaborative intelligence sharing.
    • New Jersey State Police’s initiative to create their Crime Gun Intelligence Center that aims to standardize the policies and procedures for the NIBIN sites within their jurisdiction.
    • Chattanooga’s efforts of weekly intelligence reports and one location that has the capacity to take in, analyze and send back processed information.
  • Securing the Public Buy-In is the seventh component, which is done by illustrating the value and potential of the preventive crime gun program which Chattanooga accomplished through community presentations and setting up a dedicated email for gun/violence related tips, among others.
  • The last component of expanding the program and getting other agencies to join or emulate the strategy.
    • New Jersey’s approach of continuous outreach to the public, communication and collaboration with the shareholders, and employing help from the academe to create insights out of years of data.
    • Chattanooga’s efforts to create/update policies and procedures, and conduct training.
  • Best practices employed by Major Kane and Sergeant May’s teams:
    • A resource/print-out made available to law enforcement on what to do when faced with crime gun incidents.
    • A gun questionnaire to be filled out for every gun seizure that serves as a guide for the officers when faced with crime gun-related encounters.
  • Queries raised during the Q&A are related to:
    • Defining what ‘timely’ collection, submission and entry is.
    • Responding and reacting to the changes in the methods to procure and use firearms used for crimes.
    • The information captured on the shots fired log.
    • Working with NIBIN – the timelines to get results and backlogs.
    • The NIBIN survey results for the New Jersey State Police and working with the academe.
    • Importance of having policies in place to resolve issues in intelligence sharing.

 

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